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Technical library

The Megger technical library provides access to a range of additional content and resources such as technical guides, application notes and more. Use the filters to browse specific content (e.g. application notes) or refine your search to a particular electrical application area. 

 

If you would like to see the content we have available on a particular subject or need to locate some software, simply enter a search below. Please note, you will need to create an account to access some resources.

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    Showing item(s) 11 - 20 of 380 in total
Remote Operation of the MPQ1000 via Ethernet
We recieve feedback from many of our customers who use power quality (PQ) meters - including utilities, industrial and service providers. They have told us that one of the most important features of a PQ meter is the ability to control the unit and and view data remotely. Having to retrieve a unit from the field in order to download and then analyze the recorded data creates added expenses in time and resources.
Published: 7 April 2020
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Seven Tips for Insulation Resistance Testing
Seven tips for insulation resistance testingPaul Swinerd - Product portfolio manager - Power Insulation testing at voltages above 1 kV can be a quick and convenient way of gathering a lot of useful information about the condition of electrical equipment. To stay safe and to get the best results, however, it is important that the testing is carried out correctly. These tips should help, but remember that it’s always essential to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for the test set that’s being used, to abide by the relevant standards and to follow good working practices. 1. Use the right test leads.Manufacturers of insulation resistance testers go to a lot of trouble to produce test lead sets that will help make their instruments safe and convenient to use. Always use a lead set that’s designed for the instrument, appropriate for the test voltage you’re planning to use and suitable for the test object you’re working on. If the connections can’t be made securely, the test lead may become accidentally disconnected, leaving the test object charged to a dangerously high voltage. Never ever use test leads that show any sign of damage and never attempt to repair damaged or worn leads – replacing them is the only safe option. 2. Choose the best test voltage. Test sets are now available that will allow testing to be carried out at voltages up to 15 kV. Testing at higher voltages can yield additional and more useful information about the condition of the test object’s insulation, but using a voltage that’s too high for a particular test object to withstand can seriously damage it.  Always refer to the supplier’s data for the object under test and follow the guidance it contains on testing. If this isn’t possible, seek help from the manufacturer of your insulation tester. 3. Choose the right test. A quick one-off insulation resistance measurement can sometimes provide useful data, but modern insulation resistance test sets have much more to offer. Typically, they offer facilities for polarisation index (PI), dielectric absorption ratio (DAR), dielectric displacement (DD), step voltage (SV) and ramp tests. Full information on these tests and how to carry them out should be in your instrument’s handbook – if it isn’t consult the manufacturer. Some of these more advanced tests take a little longer to perform but, with many kinds of test object, they can provide much more reliable information about insulation condition. 4. Use an instrument with a high measuring range.If your instrument shows all results above, say, 1 TΩ as infinity, you’ve got no way of knowing that the insulation resistance of your test object has fallen from 30 TΩ to 2 TΩ since the last time you tested it. This latest result might still fall within the range that’s considered acceptable for the test object, but a big fall in resistance value like this is often a valuable early warning that a problem is developing. An instrument with a high measuring range will alert you to this situation. 5. Complete the test before disconnecting the test set. Test objects can hold a lot of charge and, particularly when they’re being tested at high voltages, the stored charge can be lethal. Modern testers guard against this problem by safely discharging the test object when the test has run to completion or when it is terminated by the user. If the test leads are disconnected prematurely, however, the discharge function can’t operate, and the test object will remain charged – and dangerous. 6. Use the guard terminal.Surface leakage over test objects like bushings can greatly reduce their apparent insulation resistance and, as a result, there have been many cases of insulators being scrapped when all that was really necessary was to clean them. Using the test set’s guard terminal – which is usually connected to a bare wire wrapped around the surface of the object under test – eliminates or at least greatly reduces the effect of surface leakage on the test results. And don’t forget that making two measurements, one with the guard terminal connected and one without, can provide a very good indication of whether or not the insulator needs cleaning. 7. Record and trend your results.A single insulation resistance measurement can give you a quick indication of insulation condition, but a series of measurements over a period of time, with the results recorded and trended, will tell you a lot more. If the insulation resistance of your test object is declining over time, for example, it’s probably a good idea to find out why, well before it declines to the point of failure. Accurate records will also quickly show up any sudden deviation from the usual insulation resistance values, which is always a strong indication that further investigation is necessary. For additional information that will help you to get the best from the time and money you invest in high-voltage insulation testing, download the free application guide to insulation testing above 1 kV.  
Published: 2 April 2020
S1-1068 Performance at Power Grid Corporation of India in 765 kV charged substation
The Power Grid Corporation of India Limited (PGCIL) is an Indian state-owned company headquartered in Gurugram, North India and engaged mainly in Transmission of Power & transmits about 50% of the total power generated in India on its transmission network. The company owns and operates about 1,61,790 circuit kms of transmission lines at 800/765 kV, 400 kV, 220 kV & 132 kV EHVAC & +500 kV HVDC levels and 248 sub-stations. Also, it has the transformation capacity of about 3,96,825 MVA as on 30th November 2019.
Published: 2 April 2020
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COMLink
Software download files for COMLink
Published: 1 April 2020
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CABA Local – Internal software for TM1700 and TM1800
PC software for Circuit breaker analysis 
Published: 27 March 2020
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TM1700 firmware
This firmware is applicable for all TM1700 models
Published: 26 March 2020
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CABA Win - PC software
PC software for Circuit breaker analysis 
Published: 26 March 2020
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ET Magazine
Check the latest ET Magazine online 
Published: 18 March 2020
BITE2 Terminal Impedance Mode
The NERC (North American Electric Reliability Corporation) now requires that the contact re­sistance from the charger connections to the battery terminals are measured. The BITE2 saves measurement data in cell strap combina­tions. When starting a test the BITE2 will prompt you to measure Cell 1. Starting on cell 1 does not allow for the measurement of the positive charger connection to the terminal. 
Published: 16 March 2020
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E-Tray Software
Software downloads for E-Tray products including Smart-Thump, EZ-Thump, EZ-Restore Overdrive and T3090.
Published: 12 March 2020
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  • Showing item(s) 11 - 20 of 380 in total